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Math Formative Assessment Checklist

For teachers using Standards Based Report cards. Here's a way to keep track of how your students are doing for each Math Standard. Input names on the left hand side of document.

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Created by:
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Content Area

  • NVACS Mathematics

Resource Type(s)

  • Assessment

Grade(s)

  • 1st Grade

Course(s)

  • No Courses Identified

Standard(s)/Course Objective(s)

  • K.CC.C.6 - Identify whether the number of objects in one group is greater than, less than, or equal to the number of objects in another group, e.g., by using matching and counting strategies. (Include groups with up to ten objects.)
  • K.OA.A.3 - Decompose numbers less than or equal to 10 into pairs in more than one way, e.g., by using objects or drawings, and record each decomposition by a drawing or equation (e.g., 5 = 2 + 3 and 5 = 4 + 1).
  • K.MD.A.2 - Directly compare two objects with a measurable attribute in common, to see which object has “more of”/“less of” the attribute, and describe the difference. For example, directly compare the heights of two children and describe one child as taller/shorter.
  • 1.OA.D.7 - Understand the meaning of the equal sign, and determine if equations involving addition and subtraction are true or false. For example, which of the following equations are true and which are false? 6 = 6, 7 = 8 - 1, 5 + 2 = 2 + 5, 4 + 1 = 5 + 2.
  • 1.NBT.B.2 - Understand that the two digits of a two-digit number represent amounts of tens and ones. Understand the following as special cases:
  • 1.NBT.B.2b - Understand that the two digits of a two-digit number represent amounts of tens and ones. The numbers from 11 to 19 are composed of a ten and one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine ones.
  • 1.NBT.B.3 - Compare two two-digit numbers based on meanings of the tens and ones digits, recording the results of comparisons with the symbols >, =, and < .
  • 1.MD.A.2 - Express the length of an object as a whole number of length units, by laying multiple copies of a shorter object (the length unit) end to end; understand that the length measurement of an object is the number of same-size length units that span it with no gaps or overlaps. Limit to contexts where the object being measured is spanned by a whole number of length units with no gaps or overlaps.
  • 1.G.A.3 - Partition circles and rectangles into two and four equal shares, describe the shares using the words halves, fourths, and quarters, and use the phrases half of, fourth of, and quarter of. Describe the whole as two of, or four of the shares. Understand for these examples that decomposing into more equal shares creates smaller shares.
  • K.CC.B.5 - Count to answer “how many?” questions about as many as 20 things arranged in a line, a rectangular array, or a circle, or as many as 10 things in a scattered configuration; given a number from 1–20, count out that many objects.
  • K.OA.A.1 - Represent addition and subtraction with objects, fingers, mental images, drawings, sounds (e.g., claps), acting out situations, verbal explanations, expressions, or equations. (Drawings need not show details, but should show the mathematics in the problem. [This applies wherever drawings are mentioned in the Standards.])
  • K.G.A.1 - Describe objects in the environment using names of shapes, and describe the relative positions of these objects using terms such as above, below, beside, in front of, behind, and next to.
  • 1.OA.C.6 - Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10. Use strategies such as counting on; making ten (e.g., 8 + 6 = 8 + 2 + 4 = 10 + 4 = 14); decomposing a number leading to a ten (e.g., 13 – 4 = 13 – 3 – 1 = 10 – 1 = 9); using the relationship between addition and subtraction (e.g., knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one knows 12 – 8 = 4); and creating equivalent but easier or known sums (e.g., adding 6 + 7 by creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 + 1 = 12 + 1 = 13).
  • 1.OA.D.8 - Determine the unknown whole number in an addition or subtraction equation relating three whole numbers. For example, determine the unknown number that makes the equation true in each of the equations 8 + ? = 11, 5 = □ – 3, 6 + 6 = □.
  • 1.NBT.A.1 - Count to 120, starting at any number less than 120. In this range, read and write numerals and represent a number of objects with a written numeral.
  • 1.MD.A.1 - Order three objects by length; compare the lengths of two objects indirectly by using a third object.
  • 1.G.A.1 - Distinguish between defining attributes (e.g., triangles are closed and three-sided) versus non-defining attributes (e.g., color, orientation, overall size); build and draw shapes to possess defining attributes.
  • 2.NBT.A.2 - Count within 1000; skip-count by 5s, 10s, and 100s.

Textbook Unit(s)

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